Chengxin Wang's HG-P407 All Weather Cross Country Built-to-last Metal 4x4 Toyato Pickup

Small Factory

Fancy-Walkin'
Running and driving chassis. With the taller shock towers, and higher arch leaf springs, the required shock length was 110mm. This length shock isn't my thing, so I went on the ebays and found these fabulous units. $15 for 4, so I got 8, and used 7. They are only aesthetic, no oil or springs were used inside. Wheels are RC4WD, which are aluminum, and have a wider front offset. This compensates for the different axle widths, and it make such a big difference. Tires are the same size and tread pattern as the Tamiya units, but are a much softer compound. These popped up on ebay about 12ish years ago, and then disappeared shortly afterwards. Really glad I got them. They have some proline foams inside, because without foams the rims would be on the ground.

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Still have to paint the battery tray but it works a treat.

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Similar to the steering, I just made up my own shifting link-bar with some rod ends and a link from the link collection.

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Went for the best: the $18 'Zoskay' servo for the shiftings.

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I was initially going to get an inexpensive hobbywing 1060, but the small price jump to the 1080 buys so many benefits I couldn't say no. With this unit, I can run the servos at 3S since the BEC supports it, as well as the servos. I also have the ability to program using the simple and sleek programming card that I already own. I have channel 4 tied to the dial switch on my fabulously advanced futaba 4PL, which I have the drag brake accessory wire tied into: Now I can drive it with freewheel, some brake, or if I decide to partake in some EXTREME (guitar wales in distance) crawling, I can not have it roll down a hill and crash into oblivion.

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In case you were wondering why there was a missing shock on the front passengers side...

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Steering.

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Why a 299 Low Profile servo? Because I prefer to keep a low profile.

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With the additional lift, the OEM front drive shaft would not reach, so I found this metal one in the bag-o-shafts.

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Angled the rear axle up a smidge.

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I am happy to report that it does indeed function forward backward turn left turn right as advertised. I did not test the all weather fun or built-to-last-ness. I did drive it around the driveway though, and it shifts into all 3 gears properly. It runs smoothly, and is really fast with the included 20-tooth pinion (on 3S). I found a Tamiya 16-tooth pinion and installed that, which made driving it in high-2 less sketchy. I believe I will be able to fit a 14-tooth pinion in there, so I will try that in the future. Honestly, I see no reason to drive this in high-2 ever, as low-2 is more suitable.
 
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Small Factory

Fancy-Walkin'
Man, even if it had none of that function, that's a fantastic looking chassis!
Nice build!
It is a good looking truck just for shelf duty.

I feel like they have the high-2 gear just for bragging rights!
Pretty much: back in the 80's the electric motors were very limited, so multiple speeds would be necessary for a truck like this to drive at a 'normal' speed but also be able to climb a hill. Today, with brushless motors (and higher voltage batteries), multiple speed transmissions aren't. I think that the most important thing in a bruiser is the ability to switch from 2wd and 4wd.
 

Small Factory

Fancy-Walkin'
Seeing as it's winter, the body will have to wait. I just quickly assembled it for pictures and shelf duty for a few months until warmer painting-friendly weather arrives.

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Weirdly, the front body mounting hole was way off. I filled it, then moved it back. Then I decided it wasn't far back enough, filled that, and moved it back again.

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