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Thread: Airbrush Paint Type and Brands

  1. #1

    Default Airbrush Paint Type and Brands

    So I'm an airbrush newbie but want to get a setup for painting hard bodies. Currently I'm working on a Team Raffee D90 Pickup Body.

    Iv'e been searching all over so either I don't know what I'm looking for or nobody has asked my question before, doubt it but here goes.

    What type of paint / brand do I want to use in my airbrush to paint my D90 Hardbody Pickup? Best answer would be a ready to go brand bottle that didn't need thinning an was readily available.

    Acrylic, Enamel, ?

    Thanks in advance for any help someone can provide.

  2. #2
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    i heard acrylic works but it needs to be thinned

  3. #3

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    So acrylic will adhere well to the hardbody? I'll prime it of course but want to make sure what I put on next stays

  4. #4
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    well i would wait to see what other say because acrylic doesnt bond to all types of plastic

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lordwayback View Post
    i heard acrylic works but it needs to be thinned
    If you don't have first hand knowledge, please don't offer tips or advice.

    Airbrushing entire bodies is tedious at best. I suggest typical Tamiya or Enamel sprays for the majority of major body work (automotive touch-up cans are great), then follow that up with an airbrush for weathering and detail work. You'll be a lot more pleased with the results that way. For airbrushing, on hard bodies, I recommend Vallejo Model Air. It's pre-thinned and ready for all airbrushes. Come in every color of the rainbow.

    EDIT: Always prime first to avoid adhesion issues.
    Last edited by imthatguy; 05-31-2020 at 03:17 PM.
    SBG OWNER YOUTUBE AXIAL AMBASSADOR GCM TEAM DRIVER VANQUISH KNIGHT CUSTOMS TEAM

  6. #6

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    Thanks imthatguy :)

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by TwIzTuD View Post
    So acrylic will adhere well to the hardbody? I'll prime it of course but want to make sure what I put on next stays
    Acrylic needs to be sprayed carefully because it’s water based. Very very light mist coats to break surface tension - point isn’t to cover the entire surface just create a very thin surface for subsequent layers to adhere to...then you can spray normal coats after one or two mist coats, but always use a very good primer to give the paint something to stick to. Mig Jimenez has several YouTube videos on spraying true Acrylic paints to get best results.

  8. #8
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    I completely agree with Imthatguy and avgatbest statements. I have been learning to use my airbrush for a few years now and have had mixed results depending on what I am trying to accomplish.

    Tamiya acrylics are lacquer based and are best used with Tamiya's own thinner and primer. I have had very good luck using their paints and thinners when thinned to about a 50/50 mix, otherwise it is too thick to spray properly.

    I have also used createx colors wicked line to very mixed success. This paint is water based and is very difficult to have adhere consistently to plastics. I have sprayed it on lexan with varying success and just last night found out that my lack of primer on a Tamiya hardbody meant that the paint flaked off pretty easily. I will be starting over with that particular body and using a Tamiya primer this time. The createx also needs to be thinned (4011) and I add an additional hardener (4030) to get it to adhere to plastic/lexan a bit better. I am still trying to obtain consistent results with these paints.

    Hope this helps and good luck!

  9. #9
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    Default Airbrush Paint Type and Brands

    Quote Originally Posted by tkw75 View Post
    I completely agree with Imthatguy and avgatbest statements. I have been learning to use my airbrush for a few years now and have had mixed results depending on what I am trying to accomplish.

    Tamiya acrylics are lacquer based and are best used with Tamiya's own thinner and primer. I have had very good luck using their paints and thinners when thinned to about a 50/50 mix, otherwise it is too thick to spray properly.

    I have also used createx colors wicked line to very mixed success. This paint is water based and is very difficult to have adhere consistently to plastics. I have sprayed it on lexan with varying success and just last night found out that my lack of primer on a Tamiya hardbody meant that the paint flaked off pretty easily. I will be starting over with that particular body and using a Tamiya primer this time. The createx also needs to be thinned (4011) and I add an additional hardener (4030) to get it to adhere to plastic/lexan a bit better. I am still trying to obtain consistent results with these paints.

    Hope this helps and good luck!
    If you’re spraying non-lexan paints on a lexan body, you’re going to have to either use an etching primer (expensive) or an adhesion promoter like Bulldog. You need something that will create a layer that “bites” into the lexan.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by avgatbest View Post
    If you’re spraying non-lexan paints on a lexan body, you’re going to have to either use an etching primer (expensive) or an adhesion promoter like Bulldog. You need something that will create a layer that “bites” into the lexan.
    Yes, I use the createx 4030 which helps it bond to lexan a bit better. I find that if I layer on a ton of very thin coats, it works quite well. But it take a lot of time compared to just using tamiya PS paints. But, they can be sprayed indoors anytime of year. Living in the North of the US (or Canada) is not completely conducive to year round painting.

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