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Thread: Reducing 2.2 to 1.9s - Tutorial

  1. #1
    Tired Guest

    Default Reducing 2.2 to 1.9s - Tutorial

    Sorry it took so long, but I was finally able to put together some pics for a How To on tires:

    Hopefully, somebody gets encouragement from it.

    Step 1

    Look at the tread and its symmetry, can you see the repeatable treads? Some treads are easier than others and these Imex Hawgs are some of the easiest. The ones shown have had all the small treads removed for improved traction in mud and slippery loose surface

    Often, the sidewall lettering is also matched along with the tread and you can work out a neat new design from the lettering. Unfortunately, not so with these Dawgs. No matter.:
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails howtotires 001.jpg  

    howtotires 002.jpg  

    Last edited by Tired; 06-08-2008 at 11:23 PM.

  2. #2
    Tired Guest

    Default cut and reduce - Step 2

    So, when you have chosen the tread section (approximately) that will be reduced, cut the tire just once across:
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails howtotires 004.jpg  


  3. #3
    Tired Guest

    Default Step 3 measuring 1.9

    There is a few ways to do this, but without using the proper calculations, the easiest way is to use your 1.9 and measure it up.

    Put the 1.9 in the bead and pull one part of the tire over the other and bring the tread section over until it meets the next matching tread on the top, AND it's a tiny bit smaller than the inside of the bead on the rim (1.85 or so). Some treads this is difficult to do because of the length of the tread elements, either too short (common) or too long.

    Too short means you may need to make the inside diameter smaller than 1.85 or so, or have an odd-looking tread in the one spot.

    These ones are easy.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails howtotires 005.jpg  


  4. #4
    Tired Guest

    Default Step 4- cutting out the section

    So, you have chosen the section, measured twice, of course. The tread section you will remove is symmetrical on the tread, meaning the chunk you take out will leave and exact "copy" when you glue the tread back together, so it is invisible in the tread design.

    DO IT! lol

    Make sure to mark the tire with your Sharpie where the cut is going to be, cause perpendicular to the bead is pretty vague without it. Sidewall is cut like a pie section...
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails howtotires 006.jpg  


  5. #5
    Tired Guest

    Default Glues

    All sorts of glue will work, this Flash Black is readily avail in Canada, other options are out there, or any CA glue for gluing your tires to rims is good, too.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails howtotires 007.jpg  


  6. #6
    Tired Guest

    Default Step 5: Gluing the tread.

    So when I first tried this, it was a disaster and had to do it twice, so I will pass on the tips for doing this easy and fast.

    Fast or "med" to "thin" CA: sets quick, so be fast:

    Test the tread together before cement, just to check. If looks ok, run a bead just along the tread cut. Leave the bead alone for now.

    Hold it so that it is perfectly matched for the 10 seconds or whatever it takes to hold tight.
    When you have let it set up for a minute or so, run a bead on a sidewall cut from bead to tread. Hold perfectly matched until set. Repeat for other sidewall.

    Works every time instead of trying to match both sidewalls, beads, and tread all at once.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails howtotires 075.jpg  


  7. #7
    Tired Guest

    Default Do it 4 times...

    These tires were easy to do, and if I decide to narrow them, I'll invite you along for that, too. Don't worry about a little CA on the outside of the treads, it will rub down with trails and dirt and whatever else you drive through until it is invisible.

    This particular stuff I use, turns whitish as it dries, then the next day you are able to crush up the tire into your fist and feel the excess glue cracking and loosening up, but the treads are welded solid. I have tried pulling tread apart and ripped the rubber in a different place!
    Running the tire softens up the glue as well, and after a few decent trail runs or a few hours of hard "usage", they are just as soft as the rest of the tire.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails howtotires 008.jpg  


  8. #8
    ChevyLuv Guest

    Default

    I have a whole new respect for you guys who modify tires after trying to reduce and Narrow a 2.2 badland down to a 1.9 and narrow it half an inch. What's the trick to getting the top to match nice and what would be a better tire to practice on first? Thanks

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
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    CHILLIWACK
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ChevyLuv View Post
    I have a whole new respect for you guys who modify tires after trying to reduce and Marie a 2.2 badland down to a 1.9 and narrow it half an inch. What's the trick to getting the top to match nice and what would be a better tire to practice on first? Thanks

    haha patients, i have done some tires that took me an hour to do just 1.
    be careful when you cut and just always cut the tire in the same place.
    use sharp sissors .
    rubber kills them fast.
    IF IT DOESNT MELT ITS NOT FAST ENOUGH!!:D

  10. #10
    jhedsy Guest

    Default

    What kind of sissors are you useing to cut tires? or what kind are recommened?

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